Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Salmon Fishing Scotland Ladies Fly Fishing on the Tay at Stanley, Perthshire.

Salmon Fishing Scotland Ladies Fly Fishing on the Tay at Stanley, Perthshire. 

The lower Tay beats at Stanley offer a great opportunity for anyone to catch an elusive spring salmon on the fly, which in most anglers minds is the ultimate achievement.

Today on the Catholes, Debbie Anderson hooked up on her first ever days salmon fly fishing after an introduction on an anchored boat taking her to a place she could not have waded to. Smiles all round!
The Tay is a big river but you should not be put off by that as modern tackle makes it much more possible.

Another instance on the Catholes with Anne Emsens hooking a lively springer a couple of years ago.
Simply picturesque scenery on a bright spring day on the river.
Another spring salmon being played for the boat on the Catholes in the famous Black Stones pool.

Alas Debbie's salmon was not a springer but it still gave her a thrill and a taste of hopefully that elusive spring salmon to come.

If you would like to come and have a go contact me on 07979528134 / 01738827416  or book on Fishtay under the beats of Catholes, Pitlochrie and Benchil.

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Sunday, January 19, 2020

Salmon Fishing Scotland Stanley beats, Tay, Perthshire Report and Prospects for W/C 20th January 2020.

Salmon Fishing Scotland Stanley beats, Tay, Perthshire Report and Prospects for W/C 20th January 2020. 



We had a superb opening day on the beats with good conditions. Over the following days the river level fluctuated due to rain especially from the west putting the river up to 10' on Friday. By Saturday after a cold night the river dropped back to a far more manageable height giving us a good day in excellent conditions. Over the first few days several Kelts and young Sea Trout have been caught giving the anglers some early action. 

The conditions for the coming week looks excellent with a dropping water opening up all the pools for fishing. The forecast is to be a little warmer but with no rain so it should be ideal for a chance of that early spring salmon. Currently the water temperature is 40F /4.5C which is certainly favourable for the Stanley beats.

As to methods, in settled conditions fishing by any method should be slow and deep with large lures to catch the elusive Tay Springer.
Fly Rods.
The Tay is a large river especially when running at a normal level and even in lower levels you are fishing another river within the mighty one so therefore a 15 foot fly rod for a 10 weight line is certainly minimum requirement for much of the season. Do not come under gunned.  In some parts of the river where it is especially wide even longer rods are used. It should be noted however that it is better to cast a shorter controlled line than try to cast out with your capabilities and have the lines end up in a mess and decrease your chances. 

Fly Lines.


In early season when the water is cold you need to cast larger flies and get them 
deeper in the water to fish them slowly. There is a tremendous choice on the market nowadays which can be quite confusing to many anglers. Any type of Skagit line that can easily cast a 15 foot sinking leader of various depths is a good choice especially to the less experienced. Iflights and a tip of choice attached are another good bet as these lines enable you to cast a longer line than normal with ease. For more experienced anglers, there are a vast array of shooting heads of different sinking abilities available as well. 

Spinning Rods.
You should have a minimum of a 10 foot rod for casting baits of 20gm to 60gms. 
Line. 
A main line of 20 pounds in nylon or 30 pounds in braid. You should use a lesser poundage far a cast such as 15 pounds so if you get caught up on the bottom you do not lose a large part of your main line. 
Baits.
Tobies from 18gm upwards. Toby Salmos are very popular in 30gms. Conventional weighted Devon’s are good especially in the Spring. Rapalas and Vision 110’s are very effective. 

What flies should I take? 
In early season bigger flies such as Tube Flies, Temple Dogs and Monkey type flies up to 2 inches in body length and larger conventional patterns in 4’s and 6’s in lower water are required. A point of note is that a lighter Tube such as an aluminium or plastic body is far easier to cast than brass. Current line technology enables you to get these lighter flies to the correct depths. Ask your ghillie for tip advice on the day.

See you on the beat. 

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Friday, January 17, 2020

Salmon Fishing Scotland Tay Opening Day at Stanley, Perthshire 2020.

Salmon Fishing Scotland Tay Opening Day at Stanley, Perthshire 2020. 

These are some pictures from our Opening day at Stanley, Perthshire with some friends and Gleneagles Hotel. The photos were taken by Yuri Janssen.

The Gleneagles team leave the iconic hotel for destination Catholes and Pitlochrie beats at Stanley. 
A young piper from Strathallan School plays a tune with the mighty Tay as a back drop. 
The march behind the piper to the river for that first cast. 
It is my turn to toast the guests and new season with the customary whiskey. 
Taking a couple of Guests in the boat to the famous Pitlochrie Pool. 
A nice spey cast with Gerry Rattray's, head ghillie at Gleneagles, approval!

A superb lunch to celebrate the day and relax after all the excitement. 
A few Kelts (spawned salmon) and several young sea trout were caught during the day but unfortunately no springers. Hopefully in the days to come that will be remedied. 
All in all it was a superb day enjoyed by all. Thank you Gleneagles. 

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Salmon Fishing Scotland Salmon in Crisis, time for urgent action.

Salmon Salmon Fishing Scotland Salmon in Crisis, time for urgent action. 

This appeared on the BBC news today.


Fisheries experts have called for salmon conservation to be made a national priority amid claims the species is approaching "crisis point".
They say environmental change and the impact of humans across the northern hemisphere is putting the fish at risk.
Conservationists are meeting politicians at the Scottish Parliament to discuss the issue.
The Scottish government said it was committed to developing a wild salmon strategy by September this year.
The Holyrood event includes a round table discussion and evening reception, sponsored by Michelle Ballantyne MSP.

She represents the south of Scotland where the River Tweed alone is estimated to be worth millions of pounds to the economy.
Dr Alan Wells, chief executive of Fisheries Management Scotland, said salmon catches had reached their lowest levels ever and nature was "sending us some urgent signals".
"Official catch figures for recent years confirm this iconic species is now approaching crisis point," he said.
"Some of the factors impacting on wild salmon stocks may be beyond human control.
"But Scotland's government and regulatory authorities now have a historic opportunity to do everything in their power to safeguard the species in those areas where they can make a difference."

On some waters in Scotland, hatcheries are operated, enabling salmon eggs to be stripped from broodstock and grown on in controlled conditions before being released back into the river.
The idea is to eliminate factors which can lead to early mortality, improving the chances of salmon reaching maturity, putting more fish into the system.
However, some ghillies and river workers with hatcheries are seeing increasing restrictions placed on the activity by Marine Scotland, who have developed a new position on stocking.
They are concerned that the fisheries scientists’ standpoint could become official government policy without proper consultation with ghillies, riparian owners and hatchery investors and employees.
Marine Scotland officials have discussed their position at river board meetings but have not achieved a consensus within the industry.
With salmon conservation becoming an increasing priority and Scotland’s fisheries struggling badly with declining catches, angler numbers and reducing local economic impacts, some ghillies believe the issue is too important to be slipped through without a full debate.
And while they understand that stocking can be contentious, even within the industry itself, they believe a full stakeholder consultation is the proper route for any future action.

This petition has never been so important to get full consultation of Stakeholders, that is Owners, Ghillies and Anglers alike.
Please click on the link and sign as it only lasts until the 28th January. 


To learn more about the petition and to sign: see Petition link: https://www.parliament.scot/GettingInvolved/Petitions/PE01782

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Friday, December 20, 2019

Salmon Fishing Scotland SGA FISHING GROUP PETITIONS PARLIAMENT ON STOCKING OF SALMON RIVERS.

Salmon Fishing Scotland SGA FISHING GROUP PETITIONS PARLIAMENT ON STOCKING OF SALMON RIVERS.


The SGA Fishing Group has launched a parliamentary petition demanding a full stakeholder consultation on the future of stocking on Scotland’s salmon rivers.
On some waters in Scotland, hatcheries are operated, enabling salmon eggs to be stripped from broodstock and grown on in controlled conditions before being released back into the river.
The idea is to eliminate factors which can lead to early mortality, improving the chances of salmon reaching maturity, putting more fish into the system.
However, some ghillies and river workers with hatcheries are seeing increasing restrictions placed on the activity by Marine Scotland, who have developed a new position on stocking.
They are concerned that the fisheries scientists’ standpoint could become official government policy without proper consultation with ghillies, riparian owners and hatchery investors and employees.
Marine Scotland officials have discussed their position at river board meetings but have not achieved a consensus within the industry.
With salmon conservation becoming an increasing priority and Scotland’s fisheries struggling badly with declining catches, angler numbers and reducing local economic impacts, some ghillies believe the issue is too important to be slipped through without a full debate.
And while they understand that stocking can be contentious, even within the industry itself, they believe a full stakeholder consultation is the proper route for any future action.
Robert White of the SGA Fishing Group has tabled the Holyrood petition on behalf of members.

“The SGA Fishing Group is not necessarily pro-stocking. There are a mix of views on the subject, across Scotland, some for, some against,” says Tay ghillie Robert White, who launched the petition on behalf of the SGA Fishing Group.
“However, we believe the proper process is for a full consultation. There is a feeling that Marine Scotland has rushed this through and then went out to try to build support. 
“We don’t feel that is the right thing to do and ruling stocking out, or certainly making it increasingly more difficult, may prove to be too hasty.
“Salmon catches are decreasing at a worrying rate in some areas and fisheries, too, are feeling the affects with some rivers recording their worst years recently. 
“Taking hatcheries - as a tool - off the table, without a proper debate, could be short-sighted and we hope everyone whose lives are bound up in salmon and the future of our rivers get a chance to have a full say.”
Hatcheries have proved successful in some rivers but less so in others, with local circumstances regarded as being a determinant.
Concerns, too, have been raised about genetic integrity of the fish although hatchery broodstock are from natal rivers in most cases.
On the other hand, some anglers in Scotland -worried at seeing their pastime eroded-, favour hatcheries because they see rivers taking a proactive approach to the problem of less fish.
“There are a number of different arguments,” added Mr White. “However, a lot of investment has also gone into some hatcheries and the people involved really need to be in the loop with the direction of travel.
“There is also a school of thought which says putting more fish into the river may enhance the chances of more coming back. All these views deserved to be properly aired.”

To learn more about the petition and to sign: see Petition link: https://www.parliament.scot/GettingInvolved/Petitions/PE01782

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Salmon Fishing Scotland The Benchil beat on the Tay, Perthshire.

Salmon Fishing Scotland The Benchil beat on the Tay, Perthshire. 


1 mile double bank, boat and bank ghillied fishing with a comfortable hut and wc just below Stanley. 
Streamy water, pools and rapids with an emphasis on traditional anchored boat and bank fishing. 

Fly fishing friendly.

In 2020 Benchil is fished on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

The beat is situated about five miles from the top reaches of the tidal water in Perth. During spring, in lower water temperatures, the salmon tend to have their first stop in these waters because of the increase in gradient and the faster streams slowing the fish down. In summer and autumn, it is a fly fisher's paradise with lovely streams and glides.
On the Benchil beat we have been looking hard at modern fishing trends and how they can improve the experience of visiting anglers. As a result we have decided to reduce the number of rods fishing our beats at any one moment from 6 to 4. This will increase the time that individual fishers spend on the productive pools, give our fishers more time in the boat and give the pools more time to rest. We are confident that these measures will increase the catches per rod per day and elevate the experience of fishing our beats to a new level. Fishing is increasingly an escape from the pressures of the modern world and the reduction in rod pressure has been greeted with great enthusiasm by our regular rods.
Benchil is situated just below the village of Stanley. It is one of the most attractive and picturesque beats on the River Tay. The beat is five miles above the tidal reaches and offers many different types of pools to fish, especially for a fly. This beat can fish well in low water conditions during the summer and early autumn for grilse and larger summer salmon. It is also an ideal beat for sea trout fishing during May and June.
Benchil offers an excellent opportunity for fly fishing in the lower water from bank and anchored boat especially in the attractive classic pools such as the Long Shot and Lundie. The beat fishes six rods, has two boats and a fishing hut with views down the Long Shot. It has 10 named pools including Skellies, Aitken Head, Plain Water, Ship Linn, Long Shot, Tail of Shot, Ewelundie, White Craigs, Little Shot and Todholes.
Bob White, the ghillie has over 40 years experience in angling for Atlantic salmon and has extensive fishing knowledge on the Tay. Bob can offer tuition in overhead and Spey casting techniques and is endorsed by Hardys, Rio and Caledonian Flies. Tackle can be supplied.

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

Friday, December 13, 2019

Salmon Fishing Scotland The Pitlochrie beat on the Tay, Perthshire.

Salmon Fishing Scotland The Pitlochrie beat on the Tay, Perthshire. 



1 mile double bank, boat and bank ghillied fishing with a comfortable hut and wc at Stanley Mills.

Streamy water, pools and rapids with an emphasis on traditional anchored boat and bank fishing.


Fly fishing friendly.
The beat is situated about six miles from the top reaches of the tidal water in Perth. In the spring with water temperatures being low the salmon tend to have their first stop in these waters because of the increased gradient causing lots of fast water and the Weir at the top of the Catholes. This makes it a prime spring beat early in the season.

On the Pitlochrie beat we have been looking hard at modern fishing trends and how they can improve the experience of visiting anglers. As a result we have decided to reduce the number of rods fishing our beats at any one moment from 6 to 4. This will increase the time that individual fishers spend on the productive pools, give our fishers more time in the boat and give the pools more time to rest. We are confident that these measures will increase the catches per rod per day and elevate the experience of fishing our beats to a new level. Fishing is increasingly an escape from the pressures of the modern world and the reduction in rod pressure has been greeted with great enthusiasm by our regular rods.
Pitlochrie is situated in the village of Stanley up and down from the former Stanley Mills. This beat is very versatile as it fishes well all year and at different heights of water. When spring fishing dominated it was the place to be, especially in the early months up to April. After the last 5 years these signs are returning and hopefully will improve.
Pitlochrie has nine named pools including the world famous Pitlochrie Pool. This beat offers good bank and anchored boat fishing in all heights of water for fly fishing and spinning. Horsey Pool is one of the best pools on the river for fly fishing in higher water. There are two boats on the beat. It now fishes four rods and has a hut situated overlooking the Wash House. There are good low water pools such as the Corner Pool, the Dyke, Kirkie and the Woodside. Horsey fishes well in higher water once the early summer or autumn rain arrives.

For availability book on Fishtay or contact us direct at 01738827416.

Salmon Fishing Scotland - By Robert White

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